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Washing and dyeing fabrics

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231. Powders for washing. 232. Powder for washing "Splendid". 233. Gloss-starch "Lustrin".
234. "Miroar" tiles. 235. Paints for fabrics.
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231. Powders for washing.

I. Powder for washing Rapid. Below are a few recipes.
Boil with constant stirring: 3 parts of residues of any fat or oil, 3 parts of ammonia (carbonate) soda and 8 parts of hot water. After saponification, add 1 part of talc and 8 parts of weathered soda, dry and grind.
6 parts of weathered soda, 3 parts of potash, 1 part of simple soap in powder are mixed. 90 parts of soda ash and 5 parts of borax are mixed,
II. Powder for washing "Perhydrol". Most laundry products used for bleaching act poorly on fabrics due to the content in these powders of more or less significant amounts of free alkali. In view of this, the composition that has received wide distribution in Germany deserves attention. The solution acts as a whitening agent and at the same time does not at all corrode the tissues. This powder consists of: 40 parts of simple soap in powder, 35 parts of ammonia (carbonic) soda, 3 parts of water glass, 12 parts of water, 20 parts of sodium peroxide. Sodium peroxide is packaged separately from other constituents (preferably in a tin) and is mixed with them only at the time of consumption. During boiling, sodium peroxide decomposes into sodium hydroxide and oxygen and, when combined with water, forms hydrogen peroxide (perhydrol), which is known to be a good whitening agent. The formed hydroxide, in turn, binds to fatty substances in soap, which, together with the soap powder entering into this composition, completes the washing. The remedy works immaculately. The absence of harmful influence on the tissues is due to the chemical interaction of the constituent parts.
III. The "phoenix" powder for washing consists of:
35 parts water, 55 parts anhydrous soda, 5 parts anhydrous liquid glass, 5 parts anhydrous soap. Based on the latest research of the chemical city laboratory in Breslau, conducted by Professor Stein, Dr. Bischoff, Hinterkirch and Kraft, on the effect of the "Phoenix" powder on fiber fibers, it is necessary to recognize Phoenix lye as harmful to laundry, since when used for washing linen is destroyed more quickly than from the action of the powder "Perhydrol".

232. Powder for washing "Splendid".

Recently, they began to use to wash kitchen utensils, floors, etc. a ready mix of soap, soda and sand. First, they prepare the soda base, for which they mix: 950 parts of soda crystal, crushed, 30 parts of soda calcined, pounded, 16 parts of alum in powder, 3 parts of potassium oxalate, 1 part of ammonia in powder. Then, 160 parts of potassium (green) soap, 30 parts of kerosene, 10 parts of turpentine 2 parts of nitrobenzene are mixed to obtain a homogeneous mass and 600 parts of soda ash, 1200 parts of soda base (see above), 8000 parts of fine (sea or river) sand. The resulting mixture is sieved through a frequent sieve.
Note. Instead of 8000 pieces of fine sand, you can take 6000 parts of fine sand and 2000 parts of pumice in powder.

233. Gloss-starch "Lustrin".

Take 15 parts of boric acid, 19 parts of borax, 3 parts of stearin, 3 parts of white wax and boil with sufficient amount of soda solution (20 | B.) until a uniform liquid mass is formed which is then dried. The resulting product is mixed with 500 parts of rice starch in powder,

234. "Miroar" tiles.

To brighten the hair, melt the 3 parts of paraffin and 2 parts of stearin and pour the liquid mass into the molds. These tiles or add to the hot starch paste, or they lightly lubricate the smooth plane of the iron and iron the iron already pressed iron. You can also rub their laundry before ironing.

235. Paints for fabrics.

Convenience and cheapness of aniline paints made it possible to color matter with a home method. Recently, a large number of different colors in bags have been put on the market. For convenience, aniline paints are mixed with dextrin and each packet is supplied with a manual for use.
Everyone understands that when painting colored matter, you can not paint dark matter in a light paint. Only white matter can be dyed in any color. Yellow matter can be painted in orange, red, green, brown, gray and black. When painting dark blue, violet or weak black paint, the olive color is obtained. Red matter can be painted in red, purple, brown. When painting dark blue, dark green and black paint, dark brown shades appear. Purple matter can be dyed in purple, dark gray and brown. When painted with orange paint turns brown, and when painting dark green paint - a dark bronze-brown color. Blue matter can be painted in blue, purple, black, brown and dark green colors. When painted with orange paint turns brown. Green matter can be painted green, brown and dark gray. When painting with black paint, it turns dark green, reaching black. Brown matter can be painted brown or black. When you use red paint turns red-brown, and when using black or dark blue paint - a dark brown color. Gray matter can be painted gray, brown, dark red or dark green. If the matter is light gray, then it can be dyed blue. When painting with a violet paint, it turns out to be gray-violet, and when painting dark-blue paint - dark blue, reaching black. Black matter can be painted only in black.
Before, different mordants were used for coloring, while for aniline paints, mordant is not required. The processing of all matter is the same.
The way of using aniline paints is the following. Released from stains and washed in warm soapy water, the substance, carefully rinsed in water, is placed in such a quantity of rain or river water in a clay or copper basin so that the water covers the matter completely. Then take the paint and dissolve it in a special vessel, boil for a few minutes in rain or river water; remove the matter from the water, squeeze it well over the pelvis, mix the paint solution with the water in which the matter just lay, and put the latter into the finished paint solution. Then the liquid is heated, with a continuous inverting of the matter, to a boil. Then remove the matter from the pelvis and, weakly wringing out, is dried in the air.
If they want to give the material a shine, some elasticity, then it is moistened on the left side with a small sponge with a weak aqueous solution of the tragacanth and then it is already ground to dryness.
Paints should be packed in two envelopes: one of parchment paper, the other of ordinary paper with the name of the paint printed on it and the way of use, and also indicating the amount of matter calculated for the portion of the paint. Here are some names of colors. Amaranth red. 8 parts of diamond-fuchsin 1, 92 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal powders of 20 g each. Each serving is designed to color 250-300 g of matter.
Crimson red. 15 parts of Echtponceau No. 9, 3 parts of oxalic acid, 82 parts of Dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal parts of 20 g each. Each serving is designed for painting 100-150 fabrics.
Diamond paint. 20 parts of erythrosine No. 1, 80 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed to color 300-350 g of matter.
Cherry red. Mix 20 parts of Cerise DIV, 80 parts of dextrin and divide into 5 equal parts of 20 g each. Each serving is designed to color 500-600 g of matter.
Neapolitan yellow. 20 parts of Naphthogelb S pat., 4 parts of oxalic acid, 76 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed for 200-250 g of silk or wool (for cotton fabrics it does not suit).
Golden-orange. 30 parts of Orange II, 6 parts of oxalic acid, 64 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed for painting 300-400 g of matter.
Coffee-brown. Mix 40 parts of Vesuvin B, 60 parts of dextrin and divide into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed to color 200-250 g of matter.
Neapolitan brown. Mix 25 parts of Vesuvin S, 75 parts of dextrin and divide into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed to color 300-350 g of matter.
Red and purple. 30 parts of Methyl-Violett R, 70 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed for painting 400-500 g of matter.
Blue-violet. 25 parts of Methyl-Violett 3B, 75 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed for painting 400-500 g of matter.
Azure blue. 12 parts of Wasserblau IB, 3 parts of oxalic acid, 85 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed to color 250-300 g of matter.
Cornflower blue. 12 parts of Wasserblau TV, 3 parts of oxalic acid, 85 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal parts of 20 g each. Each serving is designed to color 150-200 g of matter.
Sea blue. 20 parts of Neuvictoriagrun II, 20 parts of Methyl-Violett B, 60 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed to color 400-450 g of matter.
Dark blue. 40 parts of Echtblau R, 10 parts of oxalic acid, 50 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed for the coloration of 200-250 g of silk or wool (for cotton fabric is not suitable).
Malachite green. 25 parts of Malachitgrun II, 75 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed to color 500-600 g of matter.
Pearl gray. 15 parts of Nigrosin B, 5 parts of oxalic acid, 80 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed for the coloration of 200-250 g of silk or wool (for cotton fabric is not suitable).
Slate-black. 30 parts of Anilin Tiefschwara R, 10 parts of oxalic acid, 60 parts of dextrin are mixed and divided into 5 equal portions of 20 g each. Each serving is designed to color 50-100 g of silk or wool (for cotton fabric is not suitable).