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Lighting with T4, T5 and T8 lumps

Technical characteristics, used gear, spectral combinations

Aquarium Lighting

Any, even the most primitively organized aquarium, should be considered as an artificial microbiocenosis created by the aquarist himself. Consequently, the aquarist himself is able, to varying degrees, to control the energy flows entering the aquarium (light, temperature, water flow, feeding, etc.). The task of an aquarist is to balance these flows. You can use the formula:

proposed energy -> stored energy -> released energy

It is important to understand that dissimilation processes should not prevail over synthesis processes in both individual species and the aquarium's species community as a whole. The primary producers in the aquarium trophic chain are chemo- and photosynthetic bacteria, lower algae, and green plants.

So, how do you need to properly light your aquarium? Unfortunately, I still have never met in the sale of ready-made aquariums, in which the lighting would be well thought out. As a rule, they either lack the lamps, or, worse, the length of the lamps does not correspond to the length of the aquarium. This means that the plant community will not receive the necessary amount of light energy for further transformations. With an aquarium height of 40-50 cm, the luminous flux should be in the range of 30-50 lumens per liter. And no calculations in watts! Fluorescent tubes of the same length have different light output:

  • Lamp LB-40 - 2800 lm
  • Hagen Sun Glo - 3100 lm
  • Hagen AquaGlo - 960 lm
  • Sylvania DaylightStar - 3250 lm

A sure sign of proper lighting in an aquarium — when, 3-4 hours after the light is switched on, oxygen begins to be emitted from the intercellular space of plant tissues in the form of optically visible bubbles. By the way, a big misconception is the opinion that the release of atomic oxygen is the beginning of photosynthesis. For this, it is enough that one quantum of light falls on the chlorophyll molecule. In this case, the oxygen, which is cleaved from the water molecule during the photolysis process, diffuses into the water as a by-product. But first, in the first hours after turning on the light, the oxygen released dissolves in the water. And only then, with the glut of intercellular fluid with it, it begins to stand out visible to the eyes. Naturally, this oxygen release under normal illumination is possible only with a sufficient amount of CO2, the optimum temperature, and a nutritionally balanced micro and macro element. Thus, when calculating the lighting, the first thing to do is to calculate the required luminous flux in your aquarium.

Now let's talk about the spectral composition of the lighting aquarium. In the photoculture of plants, much attention is paid to the spectral composition of the proposed light. The spectral composition influences all the vital processes of plant organisms, growth, development, photoperiodism, movement, pigment formation, plant color, etc. One can argue indefinitely about the effect of light quality in the process of photosynthesis on various biochemical reactions and the orientation of photosynthesis itself, to say that plants need more orange-red longwave radiation than blue-violet shortwave. Comparative studies of the intensity of photosynthesis in some plants when illuminated below the light saturation showed that the intensity of photosynthesis was maximum in the red and minimum in the blue and green parts of the spectrum. With light saturation, the maximum speeds of photosynthesis for rays of different wavelengths were almost the same. When aligning the illumination by the number of absorbed quanta, the photosynthesis curves for red, blue and white colors coincided.

Tips "advanced" aquarists on the use of only special fitolamp with a predominance of the red component in the spectrum is not entirely correct. Such advice makes sense only with a frank lack of coverage. In my aquariums, I use a combination of Hagen SunGlo and AquaGlo and Sylvania GroLux, AquaStar and DaylightStar lamps. It is the GroLux lamp that has a well-calibrated composition with maximum peaks in the blue-violet and orange-red parts of the FAI spectrum (physiologically active radiation). The combination of SunGlo with others and lamps similar in spectral data with GroLux also gave interesting results.

After differential spectrometry, it was found that the absorption bands of the pigment systems of most long-stemmed plants in my aquariums are close to the spectral curves of the GroLux lamp.

In general, gradually for myself I came to the following conclusion: in a properly organized aquarium with plants, two types of lamps should be used: those that give the maximum luminous flux to achieve a norm of 30-50 lm / l and phytolamps with a maximum absorption spectrum of the plant pigment systems. As first ones, I prefer Hagen LifeGLO, SunGlo and Sylvania AquaStar, DaylightStar. Second lamps: Hagen AquaGlo and Sylvania GroLux. But the Hagen phytolamp FloraGlo, I myself spoil myself - despite the good growth of plants under it, it fairly stimulates the development of algae.

In addition to brightness and spectrum, the third important parameter is the length of daylight. There is a fairly common opinion that light inhibits plant growth. In fact, light limits only the stretching phase of cells and accelerates their transition to differentiation. Many aquarists still think that plants grow only in the dark. It is not, and here's why. The increase in the size of a multicellular plant is solely due to the growth of cells in the stretching phase. And that's just the light just inhibits cell stretching, but not completely. Cell mitosis occurs continuously and also continuously, albeit at different rates, an increase in cell size occurs.

In a decorative aquarium you need to find a compromise between the desire to observe your aquarium as much as possible and the right rhythm day and night in the life of plants. My aquariums are lit 10-12 hours a day, from 10 to 20-22 hours; peak oxygen saturation occurs at 19-21 hours, about 13mg / l. 100 percent oxygen saturation of the water is approximately 5 hours after the lights are turned on. All in full accordance with the recommendations of Caspar Horst.

Sufficient daylight for most plants in aquariums is 8-10 hours, which is clearly seen by closing the apical points of long-stemmed plants.

Technical characteristics of lighting

A picture that shows how much the light intensity is reduced at the bottom of an aqua, depending on its depth:

Aquarium Lighting

picture on the penetration of light into the thickness of water:

Aquarium Lighting

Osram color product catalog in .PDF format:
[ Osram color product catalog in format ] [ Osram color product catalog in format ]

The spectral characteristics of the LL from the manufacturer Osram:

LL color marking indices:

Aquarium Lighting
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Aquarium Lighting
Aquarium Lighting

Compatible with LL and specifications for electronic ballasts for frame size T5 from Osram:

Aquarium Lighting
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Aquarium Lighting

The main producers of non-specialized (or non-aquarium) lamps, the linear dimensions of the lamps of the main power:

Aquarium Lighting
Aquarium Lighting

The main characteristics of LL type T4 and T5 from the manufacturer Navicator:

Possible malfunctions of the lump lamp:

Aquarium Lighting
Aquarium Lighting

Characteristics of LUMLAMP from DENERLE:

Aquarium Lighting
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Aquarium Lighting
Aquarium Lighting

Characteristics of lamps from HAGEN:

Aquarium Lighting
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Aquarium Lighting

Here are the catalogs for Lumlam 2007 and 2009/2010, as well as a catalog for special lamps for aqua and terra from Sylvania:

Photo aquariums and line-up lighting lamps:

01_FloraSet 02_Philips965 02_sp_Philips965 03_Philips950 03_sp_Philips950
01_FloraSet.jpg 02_Philips965.jpg 02_sp_Philips965.jpg 03_Philips950.jpg 03_sp_Philips950.jpg
04_Philips940 04_sp_Philips940 05_Philips930 05_sp_Philips930 06_PhilipsAquarelle
04_Philips940.jpg 04_sp_Philips940.jpg 05_Philips930.jpg 05_sp_Philips930.jpg 06_PhilipsAquarelle.jpg
06_sp_PhilipsAquarelle 07_Philips840 07_sp_Philips840 08_Philips830 08_sp_Philips830
06_sp_PhilipsAquarelle.jpg 07_Philips840.jpg 07_sp_Philips840.jpg 08_Philips830.jpg 08_sp_Philips830.jpg
09_Philips827 09_sp_Philips827 10_WarmWhite 10_sp_WarmWhite 11_SylvaniaAquastar
09_Philips827.jpg 09_sp_Philips827.jpg 10_WarmWhite.jpg 10_sp_WarmWhite.jpg 11_SylvaniaAquastar.jpg
11_sp_SylvaniaAquastar 12_SylvaniaGroLux 12_sp_SylvaniaGroLux 13_AiMBioLux 13_sp_AiMBioLux
11_sp_SylvaniaAquastar.jpg 12_SylvaniaGroLux.jpg 12_sp_SylvaniaGroLux.jpg 13_AiMBioLux.jpg 13_sp_AiMBioLux.jpg
14_AiMDayHiGlow 14_sp_AiMDayHiGlow 15_ArcadiaTropical 15_sp_ArcadiaTropical 16_ArcadiaFresh
14_AiMDayHiGlow.jpg 14_sp_AiMDayHiGlow.jpg 15_ArcadiaTropical.jpg 15_sp_ArcadiaTropical.jpg 16_ArcadiaFreshwater.jpg
16_sp_Arcadia Freshwater 17_ArcadiaMarineWhite 17_sp_ArcadiaMarineWhite 18_HagenMarineGlo 18_sp_HagenMarineGlo
16_sp_ArcadiaFreshwater.jpg 17_ArcadiaMarineWhite.jpg 17_sp_ArcadiaMarineWhite.jpg 18_HagenMarineGlo.jpg 18_sp_HagenMarineGlo.jpg
19_HagenFloraGlo 19_sp_HagenFloraGlo 20_HagenPowerGlo 20_sp_HagenPowerGlo 21_HagenAquaGlo
19_HagenFloraGlo.jpg 19_sp_HagenFloraGlo.jpg 20_HagenPowerGlo.jpg 20_sp_HagenPowerGlo.jpg 21_HagenAquaGlo.jpg
21_sp_HagenAquaGlo 22_HagenLifeGlo 22_sp_HagenLifeGlo 23_HagenSunGlo 23_sp_HagenSunGlo
21_sp_HagenAquaGlo.jpg 22_HagenLifeGlo.jpg 22_sp_HagenLifeGlo.jpg 23_HagenSunGlo.jpg 23_sp_HagenSunGlo.jpg
24_FreshwaterMarine 25_FreshwaterTropical 26_AquaGloSunGlo 27_AquaGloLifeGlo 28_FloraGloSunGlo
24_FreshwaterMarine.jpg 25_FreshwaterTropical.jpg 26_AquaGloSunGlo.jpg 27_AquaGloLifeGlo.jpg 28_FloraGloSunGlo.jpg
29_FloraGloLifeGlo 30_PowerGloLifeGlo 31_PowerGloMarineGlo 32_GroLuxAquastar 33_BioLuxDayHiGlow
29_FloraGloLifeGlo.jpg 30_PowerGloLifeGlo.jpg 31_PowerGloMarineGlo.jpg 32_GroLuxAquastar.jpg 33_BioLuxDayHiGlow.jpg
34_965MarineGlo 35_Aquastar940 36_Aquastar930 37_950940 38_SolarUltraTropic
34_965MarineGlo.jpg 35_Aquastar940.jpg 36_Aquastar930.jpg 37_950940.jpg 38_SolarUltraTropic.jpg
39_SolarUltraNatur 40_SolarUltraMarinDay 41_SUTropicSUNatur 42_SUNaturSUMarinDay 43_Halogeeni
39_SolarUltraNatur.jpg 40_SolarUltraMarinDay.jpg 41_SUTropicSUNatur.jpg 42_SUNaturSUMarinDay.jpg 43_Halogeeni.jpg
44_HPLN80W 45_Philips942HQI 46_AqualineCWHQI 47_AqualineDWHQI 48_OsramDHQI
44_HPLN80W.jpg 45_Philips942HQI.jpg 46_AqualineCWHQI.jpg 47_AqualineDWHQI.jpg 48_OsramDHQI.jpg
49_OsramWDLHQI 50_Arcadia14KHQI
49_OsramWDLHQI.jpg 50_Arcadia14KHQI.jpg